Islamic Scholarship Fund

Application Deadline:  March 21, 2017

The mission of the Islamic Scholarship Fund (ISF) is to increase American Muslim representation in media, politics and government. For the last 8 years, ISF has awarded 221 scholarships and grants. In 2016, it awarded $183,500 divided across 58 awards.

Eligible applicants are:

  • Muslim or active members of the Muslim community
  • Enrolled at an accredited university in the U.S. by August 2017 in either an undergraduate (junior/senior) or graduate program
  • Maintaining a minimum 3.0 Grade Point Average
  • Majoring in an ISF-supported major or degree program related to film, media, journalism, writing, law, political science, public administration, international studies, history, sociology, or religious studies (the complete list of eligible fields is available here)

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

ARDRAW Small Grant Program

Application Deadline:  March 2, 2017

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Analyzing Relationships between Disability, Rehabilitation and Work (ARDRAW) Small Grant Program is a one-year $10,000 stipend program awarded to graduate-level students to conduct supervised independent research designed to foster new analysis of work, rehabilitation, and disability issues, which may develop innovative and fresh perspectives on disability.

Potential research areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:

  • Working conditions of SSA beneficiaries
  • Work accommodations and needs of SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-competitive employment for SSA beneficiaries
  • Vocational and other types of service use by SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-SSA assistance provided to SSA beneficiaries

Applicants must be masters, doctoral, or post-doctoral-level part-time or full-time graduate students pursuing studies in accredited programs at the time of the award (Fall semester of 2017) with an academic emphasis in topics of interest to disability programs, including, but not limited to, public health, social work, economics, occupational medicine, vocational and rehabilitation counseling, public policy and administration, sociology, psychology, education, medicine, employment, and law.

At the time of stipend award, awardees must be citizens or non-citizen nationals of the United States, or must have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Members of minority and historically disadvantaged groups are encouraged to apply.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship

Application Deadline:  January 31, 2017

Through its Minority Fellowship Program (MFP), the American Sociological Association (ASA) supports the development and training of sociologists of color in any sub-area or specialty in the discipline. For 43 years, the MFP has supported more than 500 Fellows in pursuit of a doctoral degree in sociology. Areas of interest for former Fellows include social psychology, gender and sexuality, education, medicine and health, inequalities and stratification, race and ethnicity, and more. All of these areas of research and expertise are not just important for the growth of the discipline, but also to address important issues facing society. Sociologists have much to contribute to these research agendas, and many former Fellows have published or presented their work at leading conferences in their specialty area.

The annual stipend for each award (August 1- July 31) is $18,000. In addition, arrangements for the payments of tuition are made with universities or departments. There are also limited funds available for travel to the ASA Annual Meeting each August, regional or aligned association meetings in the spring or fall, and professional development training programs and workshops.

Eligibility:

MFP applicants must be enrolled in (and have completed one full academic year) in a program that grants the Ph.D. in sociology. MFP Fellows are selected on the basis of their commitment to research, the focus of their research experience, academic achievement, scholarship, writing ability, research potential, financial need, and racial/ethnic minority background. Specifically, applicants must be members of one of the following racial/ethnic groups: Blacks/African Americans, Latinos/as (e.g., Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans), American Indians or Alaskan Natives, and Asians (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Southeast Asian), or Pacific Islanders (e.g., Hawaiian, Guamanian, Samoan, Filipino). Fellows must be citizens or non-citizen nationals of the U.S., or have been lawfully admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence and have in their possession an Alien Registration Card.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Center for Engaged Scholarship Dissertation Fellowships

Application Deadline:  December 15, 2016

The Center for Engaged Scholarship’s dissertation fellowships are intended to support graduate students whose research advances progressive values. Applications are accepted from Ph.D. students in the social sciences who have already completed all departmental and institutional requirements for the Ph.D. degree, including approval of the dissertation proposal. The only requirements not completed must be the writing and, where required, the defense of the dissertation.

The competition is limited to the social sciences:  anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, social psychology, and sociology. Work inspired by these disciplines carried out in interdisciplinary programs such as ethnic studies, women’s studies, or American studies is also accepted.

The competition is open to all Ph.D students who meet the fellowship qualifications if they are enrolled in a U.S. Ph.D program. This includes foreign nationals and undocumented individuals. Successful applicants will be notified in April 2017 and will receive a stipend of $25,000.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

School for Advanced Research Resident Scholar Fellowship

Application Deadline:  November 7, 2016

Resident scholar fellowships are awarded annually by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to up to six scholars who have completed their research and who need time to prepare manuscripts or dissertations on topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from related fields such as history and sociology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply. Competitive proposals have a strong empirical dimension, meaning that they address the facts of human life on the ground. They also situate the proposed research within a specific cultural or historical context and engage a broad scholarly literature. Applicants should make a convincing case for the intellectual significance of their projects and their potential contribution to a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

SAR’s beautiful campus nourishes the scholarly spirit, combining solitude and freedom from institutional responsibilities with a lively exchange of ideas. Resident scholars are provided with an office, low-cost housing, a stipend up to $50,000, library assistance, and other benefits.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Library of Congress Kluge Center Kislak Fellowship

Application deadline:   October 15, 2016

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress offers two short-term fellowships annually for independent scholars, students, and college and university faculty to conduct research based on items from the Kislak Collection. The Kislak Short-term Fellowship is for a period of 3 months, at a stipend of $4,200 per month, for residential research at the Library of Congress.

The Kislak Fellows Program supports scholarly research that contributes significantly to a greater understanding of the history and cultures of the Americas. It provides an opportunity for concentrated use of materials from the Kislak Collection and other collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency at the Library. The program supports research projects in the disciplines of archaeology, history, cartography, epigraphy, linguistics, ethno-history, ethnography, bibliography and sociology, with particular emphasis on Florida, the circum-Caribbean region and Mesoamerica.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: https://loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/kislakshort.html

American Educational Research Association (AERA) Dissertation Grants Program

Application deadline:   August 25, 2016

AERA Dissertation Grants Program seeks to stimulate research on U.S. education issues using data from the large-scale, national and international data sets supported by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), NSF, and other federal agencies, and to increase the number of education researchers using these data sets. The program supports research projects that are quantitative in nature, include the analysis of existing data from NCES, NSF or other federal agencies, and have U.S. education policy relevance.

Applicants for Dissertation Grants may be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a doctoral program. Non-U.S. citizens enrolled in a doctoral program at a U.S. institution are also eligible to apply. Applicants should be advanced doctoral students at the dissertation writing stage.

Awards for Dissertation Grants are up to $20,000 for 1-year projects and are non-renewable.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.aera.net/ProfessionalOpportunitiesFunding/FundingOpportunities/AERAGrantsProgram/tabid/10242/Default.aspx

Center for Engaged Scholarship Dissertation Fellowships

Application deadline:   January 31, 2016

The Center for Engaged Scholarship’s dissertation fellowships are intended to support graduate students whose research advances progressive values.

Applications are accepted from Ph.D. students in the social sciences who have already completed all departmental and institutional requirements for the Ph.D. degree, including approval of the dissertation proposal. The only requirement not completed must be the writing and where required, the defense, of the dissertation.

The competition is limited to the social sciences or interdisciplinary programs with a strong social science component. The following areas of study apply: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, social psychology, sociology. Work inspired by these disciplines carried out in interdisciplinary programs such as ethnic studies, women’s studies, or American studies is also accepted.

The competition is open to all Ph.D students who meet the fellowship qualifications, as long as they are enrolled in a U.S. Ph.D program. This includes foreign nationals and undocumented individuals.

Successful applicants will be notified by April 18, 2016, and will receive a stipend of $25,000 paid out over a 9 month period.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.cescholar.org/dissertation-fellowships/

UW Comparative Religion Eugene and Marilyn Webb Scholarship

Application deadline:   January 15, 2016

The Eugene and Marilyn D. Webb Scholarship recognizes academic merit and promise at both the undergraduate and graduate level by awarding grants to students on the basis of their academic record and writing ability. Candidates must be either a major in the Comparative Religion Program or an enrolled student in the Comparative Religion track of the International Studies Master’s degree program and have completed at least one quarter of work at the UW. (Students with at least one quarter’s work at the UW are eligible to apply.) Should no qualified Comparative Religion candidates be identified, the Comparative Religion faculty may award students majoring in an adjacent field of study (for example: anthropology, history, literature, philosophy or sociology) but with a special interest in the comparative study of religion.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: https://jsis.washington.edu/religion/scholarships.shtml

Social Science Research Council (SSRC) International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)

Application deadline:   November 3, 2015

Webinar:   October 13, 2015

The program

The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) offers nine to twelve months of support to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled in PhD programs in the United States and conducting dissertation research on non-US topics. Eighty fellowships are awarded annually. Fellowship amounts vary depending on the research plan, with a per-fellowship average of $20,000. The fellowship includes participation in an SSRC-funded interdisciplinary workshop upon the completion of IDRF-funded research.

Eligibility

The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences—regardless of citizenship—enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants to the 2016 IDRF competition must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins or by December 2016, whichever comes first.

The program invites proposals for dissertation research conducted, in whole or in part, outside the United States, on non-US topics. It will consider applications for dissertation research grounded in a single site, informed by broader cross-regional and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as applications for multi-sited, comparative, and transregional research. Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals that focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible.

Applicants from select disciplines within the humanities (Art History, Architectural History, Classics, Drama/Theater, Film Studies, Literature, Musicology, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Theory, and Religion) are welcome to request three or more months of funding for international on-site dissertation research in combination with site-specific research in the United States, for a total of nine to twelve months of funding. All other applicants (for instance, those in Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology, among others) must request nine to twelve months of on-site, site-specific dissertation research with a minimum of six months of research outside of the United States. Research within the United States must be site-specific (e.g., at a particular archive) and cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings. Please note that the IDRF program supports research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up.

Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research in one country by the start of their proposed IDRF research may be ineligible to apply to the IDRF to extend research time in the same country. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the IDRF program, depending on completed research time and funding. The IDRF program expects fellows to remain at their research site(s) for the full nine- to twelve-month funding period. The IDRF program will not support study at foreign universities, conference participation, or dissertation write-up. The program does not accept applications from PhD programs in law, business, medicine, nursing, or journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programs that do not lead to a PhD.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/idrf-fellowship/