ACSUS-Enders Graduate Fellowship in Canada-US Relations

Application Deadline:  March 31, 2017

The Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS) offers a $3,500 graduate fellowship to encourage in-depth inclusion of Canadian content in comparative research or projects that have policy relevance for Canada-U.S. relations or Canadian social, economic, political, security, and quality of life issues. The fellowship is intended to enable successful candidates to spend 4-6 weeks at a Canadian university, research site or business conducting research related to their thesis, dissertation or graduate work in the field of Canadian Studies.

Topics particularly relevant to Canada-U.S. relations include trade and economics, defense and security cooperation, border management, energy, softwood lumber, environment and natural resource management, and agriculture. Other potential topics include comparative urban planning, health care delivery, multicultural educational policies, and environmental law.

Eligible students must be enrolled in a full-time masters or doctoral program at an institution in the United States.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Center for Engaged Scholarship Dissertation Fellowships

Application Deadline:  December 15, 2016

The Center for Engaged Scholarship’s dissertation fellowships are intended to support graduate students whose research advances progressive values. Applications are accepted from Ph.D. students in the social sciences who have already completed all departmental and institutional requirements for the Ph.D. degree, including approval of the dissertation proposal. The only requirements not completed must be the writing and, where required, the defense of the dissertation.

The competition is limited to the social sciences:  anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, social psychology, and sociology. Work inspired by these disciplines carried out in interdisciplinary programs such as ethnic studies, women’s studies, or American studies is also accepted.

The competition is open to all Ph.D students who meet the fellowship qualifications if they are enrolled in a U.S. Ph.D program. This includes foreign nationals and undocumented individuals. Successful applicants will be notified in April 2017 and will receive a stipend of $25,000.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

American Educational Research Association (AERA) Dissertation Grants Program

Application deadline:   August 25, 2016

AERA Dissertation Grants Program seeks to stimulate research on U.S. education issues using data from the large-scale, national and international data sets supported by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), NSF, and other federal agencies, and to increase the number of education researchers using these data sets. The program supports research projects that are quantitative in nature, include the analysis of existing data from NCES, NSF or other federal agencies, and have U.S. education policy relevance.

Applicants for Dissertation Grants may be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents enrolled in a doctoral program. Non-U.S. citizens enrolled in a doctoral program at a U.S. institution are also eligible to apply. Applicants should be advanced doctoral students at the dissertation writing stage.

Awards for Dissertation Grants are up to $20,000 for 1-year projects and are non-renewable.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.aera.net/ProfessionalOpportunitiesFunding/FundingOpportunities/AERAGrantsProgram/tabid/10242/Default.aspx

Re:Gender Mariam K. Chamberlain Dissertation Award

Application deadline:   May 27, 2016

Re:Gender, formerly National Council for Research on Women, was established in 1981 by a group of feminist researchers who were looking to connect their similar organizations and promote research by and about women. The Mariam K. Chamberlain Dissertation Award creates an opportunity for a first-generation college graduate, including immigrant students, to continue working on a dissertation under the close supervision of a senior dissertation advisor over an academic year.

The student must have completed all course work; have a dissertation advisor; and expect to have passed all preliminary examinations (i.e., ABD status) by the time the award begins in August 2016. This award is not restricted to U.S. citizens.

$10,000 will be awarded annually: $8,500 to a graduate student (preference is to award a student who identifies as a woman); and $1,500 to the student’s dissertation advisor for travel expenses related to the award.

The student’s dissertation must be related to Re:Gender’s mission to end gender inequity and its three program focus areas: Identity (social construction of gender, including intersections of race, class, sexual orientation, sexual identity, ability, geography, etc., as well as discrimination based on gender); Economic well-being (issues of economic justice, work fairness and business leadership); and Thriving environments (from personal safety, e.g., sexual assault, to community and global concerns, e.g., climate change and civic leadership).

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://regender.org/MKCAwardInfo

Women in International Trade (WIIT) Scholarship

Application deadline:   March 15, 2016

The WIIT Charitable Trust scholarship program is designed to provide financial assistance to further educational objectives of women who are interested in international development, international relations, international trade, international economics, or international business. Winners receive a scholarship award of $1,500 and a free one-year membership to WIIT. Scholarships are awarded to one female undergraduate and one female graduate student during each scholarship period.

Applications for the Fall 2016 semester will be accepted until March 15, 2016 and applications for the Spring 2017 semester will be accepted until July 15, 2016.

For complete information about this opportunity, including application details, see: https://wiit.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/WIIT-Scholarship-Program-Form-2016-2017-1.pdf

Joseph L. Fisher Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships

Application deadline:   February 20, 2016

Resources for the Future (RFF) awards academic fellowships of $18,000 in support of doctoral dissertation research on issues related to the environment, natural resources, or energy. Awardees will be invited to give a presentation of their research at RFF, for which RFF will pay reasonable travel expenses.

RFF’s primary research disciplines are economics and other social sciences, and proposals originating in these fields will have the greatest likelihood of success. Proposals from the physical or biological sciences must have an immediate and obvious link to environmental policy matters.

Eligibility

This fellowship supports graduate students in the final year of their dissertation research. Fellowship applicants for 2016–2017 must expect to complete all requirements for their doctorate by the end of summer 2017. Applicants must also have completed the preliminary examinations for their doctorate prior to the application deadline.
The program is open to both US and non-US citizens, provided that the latter have proper work and residency documentation.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.rff.org/about/joseph-l-fisher-doctoral-dissertation-fellowships

Center for Engaged Scholarship Dissertation Fellowships

Application deadline:   January 31, 2016

The Center for Engaged Scholarship’s dissertation fellowships are intended to support graduate students whose research advances progressive values.

Applications are accepted from Ph.D. students in the social sciences who have already completed all departmental and institutional requirements for the Ph.D. degree, including approval of the dissertation proposal. The only requirement not completed must be the writing and where required, the defense, of the dissertation.

The competition is limited to the social sciences or interdisciplinary programs with a strong social science component. The following areas of study apply: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, social psychology, sociology. Work inspired by these disciplines carried out in interdisciplinary programs such as ethnic studies, women’s studies, or American studies is also accepted.

The competition is open to all Ph.D students who meet the fellowship qualifications, as long as they are enrolled in a U.S. Ph.D program. This includes foreign nationals and undocumented individuals.

Successful applicants will be notified by April 18, 2016, and will receive a stipend of $25,000 paid out over a 9 month period.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.cescholar.org/dissertation-fellowships/

Winter 2016 TA Position in the Evans School

Application deadline:   December 14, 2015

The Evans School of Public Policy and Governance is looking for one 20 hour/week Teaching Assistant (TA) for PBAF 517, Economics for Policy Analysis and Management II. The TA will be responsible for assisting with the teaching of a section of PBAF 517.

Duties:

The specific duties of a TA will vary depending on the section, and will generally include:

  • Helping the instructor as needed to support and assess student learning (e.g., classroom support, evaluation/grading).
  • Conducting weekly quiz/review sessions on course topics.
  • Attending regular class sessions if requested by the instructor.
  • Preparing and distributing course materials, including the syllabus, lecture notes, problem sets and non-copyrighted supplemental readings.
  • Managing the course website and e-reserves.
  • Helping students meet course goals and standards by answering questions and providing assistance with students’ drafts, and writing and analytic skills as needed for each course.
  • Holding regular office hours and, for some courses, writing sessions.
  • Providing feedback as requested to the instructor on teaching effectiveness and impact.
  • Arranging for audio-visual needs for course.
  • Performing other duties as assigned.

Requirements:

  • Doctoral student, or Master’s-level student who has completed the course (or equivalent) with exemplary performance.
  • Must have completed UW Canvas learning management system training prior to start of appointment.
  • Effective oral and interpersonal communication skills.
  • Other skills needed to meet the duties listed above.

Application process:

Submit letter of application, a transcript showing grades in relevant core or equivalent courses (unofficial is ok) and a resume.
The letter of application should explain why you would like to TA, your qualifications to do so, and for which section(s) you are applying to TA.
Please consult the winter 2016 course schedule for the specific days and times of instruction and quiz sections to avoid conflicts with your own classes.

Apply on or before December 14, 2015.
Candidates will be notified of selection by 12/23.

This job classification is governed by a negotiated labor contract and is subject to union shop provisions. For more information about union shop provisions, visit:
http://www.washington.edu/admin/hr/jobs/apl/union-info.html

For complete information about this opportunity, see UW Hires Req. # 127559

United States Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Peace Scholarship Dissertation Program

Application deadline:   December 4, 2015

USIP’s Jennings Randolph Program for International Peace awards Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships to students enrolled in U.S. universities who are researching and writing doctoral dissertations on topics related to international conflict management and peacebuilding. Proposals from all disciplines are welcome.

Between 1988 and 2015, USIP has awarded scholarships to some 255 pre-doctoral Peace Scholars, whose USIP scholarships supported writing and research for cutting-edge doctoral dissertations on international conflict and peacebuilding.
Proposals should be consistent with the Institute’s mission and present a research agenda with clear relevance to policy issues. Historical topics are appropriate if they promise to shed light on contemporary issues. Area studies projects and single case studies will be competitive if they focus on conflict and its resolution, apply to other regions and cases, or both. Peace Scholar awards may not be made for projects that constitute policymaking for a government agency or private organization, focus to any substantial degree on conflicts within U.S. domestic society, or adopt a partisan, advocacy, or activist stance.

Eligibility

Citizens of any country may apply. Applicants must be enrolled in recognized doctoral programs (for example, Ph.D., S.J.D., Ed.D., Th.D.) in accredited universities in the United States. Successful candidates must have completed all course work and and examinations towards their doctoral degrees by the time their fellowships begin.

Award

Peace Scholar Awards are currently set at $20,000 for 10 months and are paid directly to the individual. Peace Scholar awards may not be deferred. They generally may not be combined with any other major award or fellowship except in special circumstances and with the written approval of the Institute.

Peace Scholars carry out their fellowship work at their universities or other sites appropriate to their research. They are expected to devote full attention to their work and provide periodic reports to the Institute. Peace Scholars may be invited to give a presentation at the Institute and to participate in Institute workshops, conferences, and other activities.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.usip.org/grants-fellowships/fellowship-opportunities/jennings-randolph-peace-scholarship-dissertation-program

Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

Application deadline:   December 1, 2015

The Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation’s ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.

The fellows receive an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Up to 15 fellowships are awarded annually. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.

Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-social work, child development, public health, medicine, public policy, education, economics, psychology, and epidemiology. In order to maximize the opportunities for interdisciplinary learning, Chapin Hall is building a sustainable peer learning network among the fellows and mentors through a series of in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls, and social networking opportunities.

Eligibility

  • Applicants must be doctoral students who will have substantially completed their coursework by August 31, 2016.
  • Each applicant’s dissertation must be focused on some aspect of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment.
  • Applicants can be enrolled at any academic institution in the U.S.
  • Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the U.S.
  • Applicants should identify an academic and policy mentor.
  • Applications must be submitted between August 1, 2015 and December 1, 2015.

For complete information about this opportunity, see: http://www.chapinhall.org/fellowships/doris-duke-fellowships