Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

Application Deadline:  December 1, 2017

The Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation’s ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.

Fifteen fellowships are awarded annually. Each fellow receives an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.

Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-child development, education, epidemiology, medicine, nursing, psychology, public health, public policy, social work, and sociology. Fellows’ dissertations must be focused on an aspect of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment.

Eligibility

Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. doctoral program and have substantially completed the coursework required to be advanced to candidacy. They are expected to complete or make significant progress on their dissertation within the two-year fellowship period. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the U.S. Most applicants will not have formally submitted their dissertation proposal until after the fellowship period begins. If an applicant is conducting research in another country, they are still eligible for the fellowship but the policy focus and implications of that work must be directed to U.S. issues. Applicants may be enrolled in any discipline. Their dissertation must be applicable to practice and policy challenges facing the fields of healthy child development and child abuse prevention.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

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UW Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS) TL1 Research Training Program

Application Deadline:  October 30, 2017

The ITHS TL1 Program is a one-year mentored research training program in translational science for predoctoral students. This program creates a cross-disciplinary community of emerging researchers and provides them with specific training, career development opportunities, and team science skills to help them function effectively within translational science teams.

The ITHS TL1 Program supports trainees on their path to becoming successful translational investigators with the following:

  • Research and study opportunities: The program provides career development through seminars, mentored training from experienced clinical researchers, experiential learning, and networking opportunities.
  • Stipend: Trainees receive monthly predoctoral stipends, which are uniformly set for all trainees by the National Institute of Health.
  • Tuition: The TL1 Program will pay 60 percent of full-time tuition (up to $16,000/year).

Eligibility

The TL1 Program is open to students enrolled in predoctoral programs within the University of Washington. These include Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, and Social Work, as well as health-related programs in the College of Engineering and College of Arts and Sciences.

To be considered eligible for the TL1 Program, applicants must be:

  • Pre-doctoral trainees training at a post-baccalaureate level and enrolled in a program leading to a PhD in a health science research-related doctoral degree program, or a combined doctoral level professional degree plus a clinical research-related advanced degree (such as a MD, DDS, DO, DNP, PharmD/MS or MD, DDS, DO, DNP, PharmD/PhD). Students who wish to postpone their professional studies for one year to gain research experience may be appointed to the TL1 Program for that period, provided that all other eligibility criteria are met.
  • A U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, with verification documents (individuals on temporary or student visas are not eligible).
  • Able to commit full-time effort in the program at the time of appointment.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

Fahs-Beck Doctoral Dissertation Grant

Application Deadline:  November 1, 2017

The Fahs-Beck Fund provides grants of up to $5,000 to help support dissertation expenses of doctoral students in the United States and Canada whose studies have the potential for adding significantly to knowledge about problems in the functioning or well-being of children, adults, couples, families, or communities, or about interventions designed to prevent or alleviate such problems.

The research for which funding is requested must focus on the United States or Canada or on a comparison between the United States or Canada and one or more other countries.

Eligibility:

  • Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited doctoral program in the United States or Canada.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Helen Dyrdal Fund Graduate Scholarship

Application Deadline: April 10, 2017

The Helen Dyrdal Fund Graduate Scholarship is for graduate students who live in King County and are working towards a degree in a “helping profession.” A helping profession is defined as: a profession addressing problems in a person’s physical, psychological, intellectual, emotional or spiritual well-being, including medicine, psychology, social work, education or ministry. It could also include a degree in non-profit management.
The fund awards three scholarships of $7,500. Although all graduate students living in King County may apply, priority is given to graduates of a Renton high school.
For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Fahs-Beck Doctoral Dissertation Grant

Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

The Fahs-Beck Fund provides grants of up to $5,000 to help support dissertation expenses of doctoral students in the United States and Canada whose studies have the potential for adding significantly to knowledge about problems in the functioning or well-being of children, adults, couples, families, or communities, or about interventions designed to prevent or alleviate such problems.

The research for which funding is requested must focus on the United States or Canada or on a comparison between the United States or Canada and one or more other countries. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited doctoral program in the United States or Canada.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Graduate School Presidential Dissertation Fellowship

Nomination Deadline:  March 31, 2017

The Graduate School Presidential Dissertation award is intended to assist Ph.D. candidates in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and social professions in the final stages of writing and completing their dissertations. The 2017-18 Dissertation Fellowship is a one-quarter award established with support of the University President. The purpose of these awards is to relieve graduate students of their teaching duties or other employment not directly related to the dissertation in order to devote their full time to writing the dissertation.

This is a one-quarter award. The award provides a stipend equivalent that of a standard Predoc TA II (currently $2,572 per month), GAIP insurance, and UW state tuition and fees (excluding U-PASS and International Student Fee) up to 18 credits. The award must be used during the 2017-18 academic year (summer 2017 through spring 2018). The choice of the quarter will be left to the discretion of the graduate student in consultation with his or her supervisory committee chair.

Eligibility

  • The student must have passed the General Examination and attained candidate status by the time of nomination and
  • The student must have demonstrated progress on the dissertation which indicates completion by the end of Summer Quarter 2018 or sooner.
  • The student must be in a tuition-based program; students in fee-based programs are not eligible.
  • The student may not have received another dissertation award from the Graduate School (e.g., Gatzert, GO-MAP)

Interested students must be nominated by their department, and departments can nominate no more than two students. For complete information about this opportunity, including details of the nomination process and a list of eligible departments, click here.

ARDRAW Small Grant Program

Application Deadline:  March 2, 2017

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Analyzing Relationships between Disability, Rehabilitation and Work (ARDRAW) Small Grant Program is a one-year $10,000 stipend program awarded to graduate-level students to conduct supervised independent research designed to foster new analysis of work, rehabilitation, and disability issues, which may develop innovative and fresh perspectives on disability.

Potential research areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:

  • Working conditions of SSA beneficiaries
  • Work accommodations and needs of SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-competitive employment for SSA beneficiaries
  • Vocational and other types of service use by SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-SSA assistance provided to SSA beneficiaries

Applicants must be masters, doctoral, or post-doctoral-level part-time or full-time graduate students pursuing studies in accredited programs at the time of the award (Fall semester of 2017) with an academic emphasis in topics of interest to disability programs, including, but not limited to, public health, social work, economics, occupational medicine, vocational and rehabilitation counseling, public policy and administration, sociology, psychology, education, medicine, employment, and law.

At the time of stipend award, awardees must be citizens or non-citizen nationals of the United States, or must have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Members of minority and historically disadvantaged groups are encouraged to apply.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

American Psychological Foundation Research Grants

Application Deadline:  March 1, 2017

The American Psychological Foundation has two research grant programs with upcoming deadlines. Graduate students are eligible to apply for both programs.

Wayne F. Placek Grant

The Wayne F. Placek Grant encourages research to increase the general public’s understanding of homosexuality and sexual orientation, and to alleviate the stress that lesbian women, gay men, bisexual women, bisexual men and transgender individuals experience in this and future civilizations. The grant provides $10,000 to support empirical research from all fields of the behavioral and social sciences on any topic related to lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender issues. For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Esther Katz Rosen Fund Grants

The Esther Katz Rosen Fund Grants support activities on the advancement and application of knowledge related to identified gifted and talented children and adolescents, including research, pilot projects, and research-based programs. Grants range from $1,000 to $50,000.  For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

JCC Association Graduate Education Scholarships

Application Deadline:  February 1, 2017

The Jewish Community Center (JCC) Association’s Graduate Scholarship Program is designed to help current and future JCC professionals deepen and enhance their professional knowledge in order to prepare or advance their career at a JCC. Graduate students pursuing their first degree in a subject area that would enrich the work of the JCC Movement are encouraged to apply! Graduate courses must be taken at an accredited university in North America.

Full-time students receive up to $10,000 per year for a one or two-year period to pursue graduate studies that lead to a professional career in the JCC Movement. As a JCC Association of North America Graduate scholar, each recipient will participate in a program of selected JCC Association educational experiences and career development seminars. Acceptable graduate degrees include Jewish communal service, nonprofit management or MBA, public policy, sports management, health and physical education, Jewish studies, social work, early childhood education, and many others.

For complete information about this opportunity, click here.