Kobe College Corporation – Japan Education Exchange Graduate Fellowship

Application Deadline:  March 1, 2018

The KCC Japan Education Exchange Graduate Fellowships Program was established in 1996 to support qualified PhD graduate students for research or study in Japan. The purpose of the fellowship is to support future American educators who will teach more effectively about Japan. One fellowship of $30,000 will be awarded.

KCC Japan Education Exchange will award the graduate fellowship to a graduate student who has a record of effectively supporting education and awareness about Japan, or who shows promise to do so in the future. There are no restrictions as to place of study in Japan, discipline of study, or age of the applicant. Preference will be given to applicants who have documented interest in Japanese studies, which includes (but is not limited to) the arts, culture, education, language, history, journalism, business or science. Preference will be given to applicants who provide written confirmation of their research or study site in Japan. Preference will also be given to applicants who have not yet conducted dissertation research in Japan. Applicants must have completed their qualifying examinations and advanced to candidacy; they must also demonstrate research level Japanese language competency.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

 

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James Madison Fellowship

Application Deadline:  March 1, 2018

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation offers $24,000 James Madison Graduate Fellowships to individuals desiring to become outstanding teachers of the American Constitution at the secondary school level. The Fellowship supports graduate study leading to a master’s degree at any accredited institution in the US.

Fellowship applicants compete only against other applicants from the states of their legal residence. As funding permits, the Foundation plans to offer one fellowship per state per year. The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the period of study, and in no case shall the award exceed $12,000 for one academic year of study. Normally, Fellows receive less than these maximum amounts. Payments are made only for the actual costs of tuition, required fees, and books (as well as room and board if required to live away from your principal residence), and are made only for the minimum number of credits required for the award of the degree for which a Fellow is registered.

Eligibility

  • Be a U.S. citizen.
  • Be a teacher, or plan to become a teacher, of American history, American government, or any other social studies class where you will teach topics on the Constitution at the secondary school level (grades 7–12).
  • Possess a bachelor’s degree or plan to receive a bachelor’s degree no later than August 31 of the year in which you are applying.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

JCC Association Graduate Education Scholarships

Application Deadline:  February 1, 2018

The Jewish Community Center (JCC) Association’s Graduate Scholarship Program is designed to help current and future JCC professionals deepen and enhance their professional knowledge in order to prepare or advance their career at a JCC. Graduate students pursuing their first degree in a subject area that would enrich the work of the JCC Movement are encouraged to apply! Graduate courses must be taken at an accredited university in North America.

Full-time students receive up to $10,000 per year for a one or two-year period to pursue graduate studies that lead to a professional career in the JCC Movement. As a JCC Association of North America Graduate scholar, each recipient will participate in a program of selected JCC Association educational experiences and career development seminars. Acceptable graduate degrees include Jewish communal service, nonprofit management or MBA, public policy, sports management, health and physical education, Jewish studies, social work, early childhood education, and many others.

For complete information about this opportunity, click here.

Doi Doctoral Student Research Fund for UW College of Education Dissertations

Application Deadline:  February 1, 2018

Former Dean James Doi established the Doi Research Fund to help defray unusual costs associated with the completion of especially worthy doctoral student dissertations in the College of Education. It was the intent of Dean Doi to help with “unusual” costs not typical of most dissertations.  For example, the award might be used to help pay for mailing costs associated with an extensive survey, but not for ordinary correspondence; the costs of leasing or purchasing unusual equipment, but not for purchasing a general use computer; the costs of professional transcription of extensive interviews, but not to pay for simple editing services to prepare the final dissertation.

No present limits are placed on the potential amount of an award, but limits on the resources provided by the fund established by Dean Doi and the anticipated number of awards each year usually result in individual awards of a few hundred dollars, rather than thousands of dollars.  A student may request an award of any amount, but the final award might be for some smaller amount.  Students are asked to request support only for activities or items that cannot be adequately supported through other means.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here (UW NetID required).

Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

Application Deadline:  December 1, 2017

The Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation’s ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.

Fifteen fellowships are awarded annually. Each fellow receives an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.

Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-child development, education, epidemiology, medicine, nursing, psychology, public health, public policy, social work, and sociology. Fellows’ dissertations must be focused on an aspect of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment.

Eligibility

Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. doctoral program and have substantially completed the coursework required to be advanced to candidacy. They are expected to complete or make significant progress on their dissertation within the two-year fellowship period. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the U.S. Most applicants will not have formally submitted their dissertation proposal until after the fellowship period begins. If an applicant is conducting research in another country, they are still eligible for the fellowship but the policy focus and implications of that work must be directed to U.S. issues. Applicants may be enrolled in any discipline. Their dissertation must be applicable to practice and policy challenges facing the fields of healthy child development and child abuse prevention.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Knowles Science Teaching Fellowship

Application Deadline:  November 26, 2017

Knowles Science Teaching Fellowship (KSTF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing new math and science teachers with professional development, resources and support to improve STEM education in our schools. We believe positive change in education should start with teachers, through leadership in the classroom and beyond. Our Fellowship helps new math and science teachers explore, test and refine new ways to connect with students and make an impact in their classrooms and schools.

The Fellowships provides teachers beginning careers in math or science teaching with mentoring and coaching, grant funds for professional development and classroom materials, summer stipends, and tuition reimbursement benefits. Approximately 35 individuals are selected each year to receive KSTF Fellowships.

Eligibility:

To be eligible for consideration, individuals must:

  • have the capacity and determination to commit to teaching as their primary career;
  • have earned a degree in a major related to the mathematics or science discipline they intend to teach no later than September 1, 2018 (this degree should have been earned no more than 10 years ago);
  • have earned or will earn a valid state teaching credential/certificate/license that enables them to teach mathematics or science in grades 9-12 in the United States no earlier than January 1, 2013 and no later than September 1, 2018; and
  • be entering their first or second year as teacher of record during the 2018–2019 academic year.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Internship Program – Winter/Spring Projects

Application Deadline:  November 15, 2017

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s (SERC) Internship Program offers undergraduate and beginning graduate students a unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the fields of environmental research and public engagement. This program enables students to work on independent research projects under the direction of a SERC mentor.

Intern projects span the range of research conducted at SERC, including environmental chemistry, marine and esturaine ecology, molecular ecology, and terrestrial ecology. Projects are also offered in public engagement, with opportunities in environmental education, citizen science, and science writing. Although students will become familiar with much of the research of SERC in general, individuals will devote most of their time to an independent research project. Students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge in a selected field of study and to learn a variety of research techniques through firsthand experience. At the conclusion of the internship, student participants will be expected to present the findings of their independent projects in a formal seminar to the SERC community.

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center will consider applications from currently enrolled undergraduate and Master’s students, or students who have recently graduated from undergraduate or Master’s programs. Applicants must be in a position to commit fully to the completion of a project. U.S. citizenship is not a requirement to participate in this program.

Selected candidates will receive a stipend of $500.00 per week. There is limited on-site dormitory space available for $105.00 per week. SERC does not supply board, but the dorms are equipped with full kitchens. We can accommodate up to 24 residents.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

National Academy of Education Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

Application Deadline:  November 2, 2017

The National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship Program supports up to 30 early career scholars working in critical areas of education research. These $70,000 fellowships support non-residential postdoctoral proposals that make significant scholarly contributions to the field of education. The program also develops the careers of its recipients through professional development activities involving National Academy of Education members.

Eligibility:

  • Applicants must have received their PhD, EdD, or equivalent research degree between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2016. Please note, if you defended your dissertation in 2016, but did not receive your diploma, or were not conferred, until 2017, then you will not be eligible to apply for the fellowship this year.
  • Applicant should have a demonstrated record of research experience in education.
  • Proposed project must be an education research project. NAEd funds studies that examine the efficacy of curriculum and teaching methods, however, we do not fund the initial development of curriculum or instructional programs.
  • Applications will be judged on the applicant’s past research record, career trajectory in education research, and the quality of the project described in the application.
  • Applications must be made by the individual applying for the fellowship; group applications will not be accepted.
  • Non-US citizens are welcome to apply.
  • Concurrent funding for the proposed project is not permitted. You may not hold a grant from the Spencer Foundation at the same time as this fellowship.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Doi Doctoral Student Research Fund for UW College of Education Dissertations

Application Deadline:  November 1, 2017

Former Dean James Doi established the Doi Research Fund to help defray unusual costs associated with the completion of especially worthy doctoral student dissertations in the College of Education. It was the intent of Dean Doi to help with “unusual” costs not typical of most dissertations.  For example, the award might be used to help pay for mailing costs associated with an extensive survey, but not for ordinary correspondence; the costs of leasing or purchasing unusual equipment, but not for purchasing a general use computer; the costs of professional transcription of extensive interviews, but not to pay for simple editing services to prepare the final dissertation.

No present limits are placed on the potential amount of an award, but limits on the resources provided by the fund established by Dean Doi and the anticipated number of awards each year usually result in individual awards of a few hundred dollars, rather than thousands of dollars.  A student may request an award of any amount, but the final award might be for some smaller amount.  Students are asked to request support only for activities or items that cannot be adequately supported through other means.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here (UW NetID required).

American Educational Research Association Minority Dissertation Fellowship Program

Application Deadline:  November 1, 2017

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is pleased to announce the AERA Minority Dissertation Fellowship in Education Research. This program offers doctoral fellowships to enhance the competitiveness of outstanding minority scholars for academic appointments at major research universities. It supports fellows conducting education research and provides mentoring and guidance toward the completion of their doctoral studies.

Each fellowship award is for 1 year, beginning July 1 or later, and is nonrenewable. This fellowship program is intended as a write-up fellowship. Fellowships are awarded for doctoral dissertation research conducted under faculty sponsorship in any accredited university in the United States. AERA awards each Fellow up to a $19,000 stipend to study education, teaching, learning, or other education research topic. The fellowship funds can be used for tuition and/or institution fees, books, living expenses, equipment, travel, supplies, software, and other expenses that are directly related to conducting this research. AERA also provides each Fellow with a $1,000 travel grant to attend the AERA annual meeting.

Eligibility:

Eligible graduate students will be at the writing stage of their dissertation by the beginning of the fellowship. The dissertation study should focus on an education research topic such as high stakes testing; ethnic studies/curriculum; tracking; STEM development; measurement of achievement and opportunity gaps; English language learners; or bullying and restorative justice. Applicants can come from graduate programs and departments in education research, the humanities, or social or behavioral science disciplinary or interdisciplinary fields, such as economics, political science, psychology, or sociology.

Fellows are required to provide proof of advancement to candidacy at the beginning of the award period. Applicants must work full-time on their dissertations and course requirements and should be in the writing stage of their dissertation. This program is open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents who are members of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in higher education (e.g., African Americans, Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islanders).

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.