UW Marcy Migdal Fund for Educational Equality

Application Deadline: April 15, 2017

The Marcy Migdal Fund supports exceptional students engaged in activities aimed at enhancing access to education for vulnerable students, either locally or throughout the world, and helping them succeed in their education. The Marcy Migdal Fund provides two awards of $1,000 per academic year.

Marcy Migdal was known throughout Washington State as a leading educator in the field of multicultural education and for her passionate commitment to social justice and advocacy for the most vulnerable members of our community. It is the intent of this endowment that Marcy’s selfless dedication and activist spirit live on in this award. Scholarships will be awarded based on the adherence of the proposed activities to the priorities of the Marcy Migdal Fund.

All undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Washington (Seattle, Bothell, Tacoma) are eligible to apply. Applicants must: be current UW students in good academic standing; complete the application process prior to the published deadline; and at the completion of the project write a short report on their project and how the funds were used. Recipients must be enrolled at UW during the quarter the award is received.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Helen Dyrdal Fund Graduate Scholarship

Application Deadline: April 10, 2017

The Helen Dyrdal Fund Graduate Scholarship is for graduate students who live in King County and are working towards a degree in a “helping profession.” A helping profession is defined as: a profession addressing problems in a person’s physical, psychological, intellectual, emotional or spiritual well-being, including medicine, psychology, social work, education or ministry. It could also include a degree in non-profit management.
The fund awards three scholarships of $7,500. Although all graduate students living in King County may apply, priority is given to graduates of a Renton high school.
For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Gatzert Child Welfare Fellowship

Nomination Deadline:  March 31, 2017

The Gatzert Child Welfare fellowship was established in the 1930s by the Bailey and Babette Gatzert foundation for Child Welfare. In accordance with the donor’s wishes, the funds are to be used to promote education for “the better care and treatment of children suffering from defects, either physically or mentally.” The one-quarter fellowship will be awarded to support the writing of a doctoral dissertation in the field of child development with special reference to children with disabilities.

Eligibility

  • Candidate must have achieved doctoral candidate status at the time of nomination
  • Candidate must have demonstrated progress on the dissertation which indicates completion by the end of Summer Quarter 2018 or sooner.
  • Candidate may not have received another dissertation writing award from the Graduate School (e.g., GO-MAP, Presidential Dissertation, etc.)
  • Students in fee-based programs are not eligible.

Award

  • The awards provide a stipend equivalent to the stipend of a standard Predoc TA II (currently $2,572 month), GAIP insurance, and UW state tuition and fees (excluding U-PASS and International Student Fee) up to 18 credits.

Students must be nominated by their departments. Departments can nominate no more than two students. Eligible programs include:

  • Anthropology
  • Bioengineering
  • Communication
  • Education
  • Epidemiology
  • Human Centered Design and Engineering
  • Information School
  • Neuroscience
  • Nursing
  • Nutritional Sciences
  • Pathology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology and Biophysics
  • Psychology
  • Public Health Genetics
  • Rehabilitation Medicine
  • Social Work
  • Speech and Hearing Sciences
  • Urban Design and Planning Group

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

ARDRAW Small Grant Program

Application Deadline:  March 2, 2017

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Analyzing Relationships between Disability, Rehabilitation and Work (ARDRAW) Small Grant Program is a one-year $10,000 stipend program awarded to graduate-level students to conduct supervised independent research designed to foster new analysis of work, rehabilitation, and disability issues, which may develop innovative and fresh perspectives on disability.

Potential research areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:

  • Working conditions of SSA beneficiaries
  • Work accommodations and needs of SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-competitive employment for SSA beneficiaries
  • Vocational and other types of service use by SSA beneficiaries
  • Non-SSA assistance provided to SSA beneficiaries

Applicants must be masters, doctoral, or post-doctoral-level part-time or full-time graduate students pursuing studies in accredited programs at the time of the award (Fall semester of 2017) with an academic emphasis in topics of interest to disability programs, including, but not limited to, public health, social work, economics, occupational medicine, vocational and rehabilitation counseling, public policy and administration, sociology, psychology, education, medicine, employment, and law.

At the time of stipend award, awardees must be citizens or non-citizen nationals of the United States, or must have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Members of minority and historically disadvantaged groups are encouraged to apply.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

James Madison Fellowship

Application Deadline:  March 1, 2017

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation offers $24,000 James Madison Graduate Fellowships to individuals desiring to become outstanding teachers of the American Constitution at the secondary school level. The Fellowship supports graduate study leading to a master’s degree at any accredited institution in the US.

Fellowship applicants compete only against other applicants from the states of their legal residence. As funding permits, the Foundation plans to offer one fellowship per state per year. The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the period of study, and in no case shall the award exceed $12,000 for one academic year of study. Normally, Fellows receive less than these maximum amounts. Payments are made only for the actual costs of tuition, required fees, and books (as well as room and board if required to live away from your principal residence), and are made only for the minimum number of credits required for the award of the degree for which a Fellow is registered.

Eligibility

  • Be a U.S. citizen.
  • Be a teacher, or plan to become a teacher, of American history, American government, or any other social studies class where you will teach topics on the Constitution at the secondary school level (grades 7–12).
  • Possess a bachelor’s degree or plan to receive a bachelor’s degree no later than August 31 of the year in which you are applying.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Doi Doctoral Student Research Fund for UW College of Education Dissertations

Application Deadline:  February 1, 2017

Former Dean James Doi established the Doi Research Fund to help defray unusual costs associated with the completion of especially worthy doctoral student dissertations in the College of Education. It was the intent of Dean Doi to help with “unusual” costs not typical of most dissertations.  For example, the award might be used to help pay for mailing costs associated with an extensive survey, but not for ordinary correspondence; the costs of leasing or purchasing unusual equipment, but not for purchasing a general use computer; the costs of professional transcription of extensive interviews, but not to pay for simple editing services to prepare the final dissertation. No present limits are placed on the potential amount of an award, but limits on the resources provided by the fund established by Dean Doi and the anticipated number of awards each year usually result in individual awards of a few hundred dollars, rather than thousands of dollars.  A student may request an award of any amount, but the final award might be for some smaller amount.  Students are asked to request support only for activities or items that cannot be adequately supported through other means.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here (UW NetID required).

JCC Association Graduate Education Scholarships

Application Deadline:  February 1, 2017

The Jewish Community Center (JCC) Association’s Graduate Scholarship Program is designed to help current and future JCC professionals deepen and enhance their professional knowledge in order to prepare or advance their career at a JCC. Graduate students pursuing their first degree in a subject area that would enrich the work of the JCC Movement are encouraged to apply! Graduate courses must be taken at an accredited university in North America.

Full-time students receive up to $10,000 per year for a one or two-year period to pursue graduate studies that lead to a professional career in the JCC Movement. As a JCC Association of North America Graduate scholar, each recipient will participate in a program of selected JCC Association educational experiences and career development seminars. Acceptable graduate degrees include Jewish communal service, nonprofit management or MBA, public policy, sports management, health and physical education, Jewish studies, social work, early childhood education, and many others.

For complete information about this opportunity, click here.

Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

Application Deadline:  December 1, 2016

The Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation’s ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.

The fellows receive an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Up to 15 fellowships are awarded annually. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.

Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-social work, child development, public health, medicine, public policy, education, economics, psychology, and epidemiology. In order to maximize the opportunities for interdisciplinary learning, Chapin Hall is building a sustainable peer learning network among the fellows and mentors through a series of in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls, and social networking opportunities.

Eligibility

Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. doctoral program and have substantially completed the coursework required to be advanced to candidacy. They are expected to complete or make significant progress on their dissertation within the two-year fellowship period. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the U.S. Most applicants will not have formally submitted their dissertation proposal until after the fellowship period begins. If an applicant is conducting research in another country, they are still eligible for the fellowship but the policy focus and implications of that work must be directed to U.S. issues. Applicants may be enrolled in any discipline. Their dissertation must be applicable to practice and policy challenges facing the fields of healthy child development and child abuse prevention.
For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program

Application Deadline:  November 18, 2016

The JET Program is a competitive employment opportunity that allows young professionals to live and work in cities, towns, and villages throughout Japan. JET Program participants are not only teachers and public servants–they are cultural ambassadors of the United States to Japan. The Program aims to enhance foreign language education and promote international exchange at the local level through the fostering of ties between Japanese youth and foreign youth alike.

The JET Program seeks participants who are adaptable, outgoing, and who have a deep interest in Japan. Applicants must be U.S. citizens, hold at least an undergraduate degree, and have not lived in Japan for 6 or more years within the last 9 years. The JET Program typically receives 4,000-5,000 applications each year from U.S. applicants. Of these, 1,000-1,100 will be selected for participation on the JET Program.

Participants receive compensation of 3,360,000 yen per year and travel expenses to cover their transportation to and from Japan. The JET Program arranges the necessary work visas for selected candidates.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, please click here.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Internship Program

Application Deadline (for Winter/Spring projects):  November 15, 2016

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s (SERC) Internship Program offers undergraduate and beginning graduate students a unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the fields of environmental research and public engagement. This program enables students to work on independent research projects under the direction of a SERC mentor.

Intern projects span the range of research conducted at SERC, including environmental chemistry, marine and esturaine ecology, molecular ecology, and terrestrial ecology. Projects are also offered in public engagement, with opportunities in environmental education, citizen science, and science writing. Although students will become familiar with much of the research of SERC in general, individuals will devote most of their time to an independent research project. Students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge in a selected field of study and to learn a variety of research techniques through firsthand experience. At the conclusion of the internship, student participants will be expected to present the findings of their independent projects in a formal seminar to the SERC community.

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center will consider applications from currently enrolled undergraduate and Master’s students, or students who have recently graduated from undergraduate or Master’s programs. Applicants must be in a position to commit fully to the completion of a project. U.S. citizenship is not a requirement to participate in this program.

Selected candidates will receive a stipend of $500.00 per week. There is limited on-site dormitory space available for $105.00 per week. SERC does not supply board, but the dorms are equipped with full kitchens. We can accommodate up to 24 residents.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.