Phillips Fund for Native American Research

Application Deadline:  March 1, 2018

The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada. Grants are not made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, psycholinguistics, or for the preparation of pedagogical materials. The committee distinguishes ethnohistory from contemporary ethnography as the study of cultures and culture change through time.

The average award is about $3,000; grants do not exceed $3,500. Grants are given for one year following the date of the award.  The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on master’s theses or doctoral dissertations.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

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American Philosophical Society Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research

Application Deadline:  January 30, 2018

The Lewis and Clark Fund encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, paleontology, and population genetics, but grants will not be restricted to these fields.

Eligibility Basics

  • Grants will be available to doctoral students. Postdoctoral fellows, master’s degree candidates, and undergraduates are not eligible.
  • Proposals that are archival in nature or museum based will not normally be considered. The proposed work should be dissertation directed to the extent possible given the applicant’s year in the doctoral program.
  • The competition is open to U.S. citizens and residents wishing to carry out research anywhere in the world. Foreign applicants must either be based at a U.S. institution or plan to carry out their work in the United States.

Award

Amounts will depend on travel costs but will ordinarily be in the range of several hundred dollars up to about $5,000. Grants are payable to the individual applicant.

For complete information about this opportunity, click here.

National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants in Cultural Anthropology

Application Deadline:  January 16, 2018

The Cultural Anthropology Program awards Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (DDRIGs) in all areas of cultural anthropological science supported by the Program. The primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is to support basic scientific research on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. DDRIGs support the development of the next generation of cultural anthropologists to pursue those questions.

The grants provide funds for items not usually available from the student’s academic institution. The awards are not intended to provide the full costs of a student’s doctoral dissertation research. Funds may be used for valid research expenses, but may not be used for post-field research writing, analysis, and thesis production costs, or for stipends, tuition, textbooks, journals, child-care, and allowances for dependents. Proposers may request up to $20,000 in direct costs and duration of up to 24 months.

The proposal must be submitted through regular organizational channels by the dissertation advisor(s) on behalf of the graduate student. The student must be enrolled at a U.S. institution, but need not be a U.S. citizen.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Leakey Foundation Research Grants

Application Deadline:  January 10, 2018

The Leakey Foundation awards funding to support research related to human origins, including paleoanthropology of the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene, and primate research encompassing evolution, behavior, morphology, ecology, endocrinology, genetics, isotope studies, or modern hunter-gatherer groups. Priority of funding is commonly given to exploratory phases of promising new research projects. The majority of The Leakey Foundation’s Research Grants awarded to doctoral students are in the $3,000-$15,000 range. Larger grants given to senior scientists and post-doctoral students may be funded up to $25,000.

Advanced doctoral students (advanced to candidacy – all but dissertation) and established scientists, including post-doctoral students, are eligible for Leakey Foundation Research Grants. There are no citizenship restrictions; however, all applications must be in English.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grants

Application Deadline:  November 1, 2017

Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grants are awarded to aid doctoral or thesis research. The program contributes to the Foundation’s overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity’s cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or anthropology subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

The maximum amount of the Dissertation Fieldwork Grant is US $20,000. Grants are non-renewable. Students must be enrolled in a doctoral program (or equivalent, if applying from outside the United States) at the time of application. Students of all nationalities are eligible to apply.  There is no time limit on the duration of the grant, and funding may be requested to cover distinct research phases (for example, two summers) if this is part of the research design. Application deadlines are May 1 and November 1. Final decisions are made six months later.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Library of Congress Kluge Center Kislak Fellowship

Application Deadline:  October 15, 2017

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress offers two short-term fellowships annually for independent scholars, students, and college and university faculty to conduct research based on items from the Kislak Collection. The Kislak Collection is a major collection of rare books, manuscripts, historic documents, maps and art of the Americas donated to the Library of Congress by the Jay I. Kislak Foundation of Miami Lakes, Fla. The collection contains some of the earliest records of indigenous peoples in North America and superb objects from the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, especially for Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica.

The Kislak Fellows Program supports scholarly research that contributes significantly to a greater understanding of the history and cultures of the Americas. It provides an opportunity for a period of 3 months of concentrated use of materials from the Kislak Collection and other collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency at the Library. The program supports research projects in the disciplines of archaeology, history, cartography, epigraphy, linguistics, ethno-history, ethnography, bibliography and sociology, with particular emphasis on Florida, the circum-Caribbean region and Mesoamerica. We encourage interdisciplinary projects that combine disciplines in novel and productive ways.

The Kislak Short-term Fellowship is for a period of 3 months, at a stipend of $4,200 per month, for residential research at the Library of Congress.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Leakey Foundation Research Grants

Application Deadline:  July 15, 2017

The Leakey Foundation awards funding to support research related to human origins, including paleoanthropology of the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene, and primate research encompassing evolution, behavior, morphology, ecology, endocrinology, genetics, isotope studies, or modern hunter-gatherer groups. Priority of funding is commonly given to exploratory phases of promising new research projects. The majority of The Leakey Foundation’s Research Grants awarded to doctoral students are in the $3,000-$15,000 range. Larger grants given to senior scientists and post-doctoral students may be funded up to $25,000.

Advanced doctoral students (advanced to candidacy – all but dissertation) and established scientists, including post-doctoral students, are eligible for Leakey Foundation Research Grants. There are no citizenship restrictions; however, all applications must be in English.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grants

Application Deadline:  May 1, 2017

Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grants are awarded to aid doctoral or thesis research. The program contributes to the Foundation’s overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity’s cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or anthropology subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

The maximum amount of the Dissertation Fieldwork Grant is US $20,000. Grants are non-renewable. Students must be enrolled in a doctoral program (or equivalent, if applying from outside the United States) at the time of application. Students of all nationalities are eligible to apply.  There is no time limit on the duration of the grant, and funding may be requested to cover distinct research phases (for example, two summers) if this is part of the research design. Application deadlines are May 1 and November 1. Final decisions are made six months later.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Gatzert Child Welfare Fellowship

Nomination Deadline:  March 31, 2017

The Gatzert Child Welfare fellowship was established in the 1930s by the Bailey and Babette Gatzert foundation for Child Welfare. In accordance with the donor’s wishes, the funds are to be used to promote education for “the better care and treatment of children suffering from defects, either physically or mentally.” The one-quarter fellowship will be awarded to support the writing of a doctoral dissertation in the field of child development with special reference to children with disabilities.

Eligibility

  • Candidate must have achieved doctoral candidate status at the time of nomination
  • Candidate must have demonstrated progress on the dissertation which indicates completion by the end of Summer Quarter 2018 or sooner.
  • Candidate may not have received another dissertation writing award from the Graduate School (e.g., GO-MAP, Presidential Dissertation, etc.)
  • Students in fee-based programs are not eligible.

Award

  • The awards provide a stipend equivalent to the stipend of a standard Predoc TA II (currently $2,572 month), GAIP insurance, and UW state tuition and fees (excluding U-PASS and International Student Fee) up to 18 credits.

Students must be nominated by their departments. Departments can nominate no more than two students. Eligible programs include:

  • Anthropology
  • Bioengineering
  • Communication
  • Education
  • Epidemiology
  • Human Centered Design and Engineering
  • Information School
  • Neuroscience
  • Nursing
  • Nutritional Sciences
  • Pathology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology and Biophysics
  • Psychology
  • Public Health Genetics
  • Rehabilitation Medicine
  • Social Work
  • Speech and Hearing Sciences
  • Urban Design and Planning Group

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Jacobs Research Funds

Application Deadline:  February 15, 2017

The Jacobs Research Funds (JRF) funds projects involving fieldwork with living peoples that result in publication or other dissemination of information about the fieldwork. Priority is given to research on endangered cultures and languages, and to research on the Pacific Northwest. Projects focusing on archival research are given low priority. Relevance of the project to contemporary theoretical issues in anthropology and linguistics is also a criterion used in evaluating proposals.

Funded projects typically focus on linguistic analysis, social-cultural anthropology, ethnolinguistics, or sociolinguistics. Especially appropriate are field studies that address cultural expressive systems, such as music, language, dance, mythology, world view, folk taxonomy, art, intellectual life, and religion. Also appropriate are projects focusing on cultural and linguistic forms in modern contexts – for example, traditional environmental knowledge or social organization. Projects in archeology, physical anthropology, applied anthropology, and applied linguistics (for example, grants exclusively for technological improvements, development of pedagogical materials, etc.) are not eligible for support.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.