Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research

Application Deadline:  December 8, 2017

The purpose of this Kirschstein-NRSA predoctoral fellowship (F31) award is to enhance the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the research training of predoctoral students from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research workforce, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups and those with disabilities. Through this award program, promising predoctoral students will obtain individualized, mentored research training from outstanding faculty sponsors while conducting well-defined research projects in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers. The proposed mentored research training is expected to clearly enhance the individual’s potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientist.

Eligibility:

  • Any applicant fellow with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) is invited to work with his/her sponsor and organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support. Multiple PDs/PIs are not allowed.
  • By the time of award, the individual must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., possess a currently valid Permanent Resident Card USCIS Form I-551, or other legal verification of such status).
  • The applicant must have identified a research project and sponsor, show evidence of high academic performance in the sciences, and a commitment to a career as an independent research scientist, or as an independent physician-scientist or other clinician-scientist (dual-degree training).
  • The applicant must have a baccalaureate degree and be currently enrolled in a PhD or equivalent research degree program (e.g., EngD, DNSc, DrPH, DSW, PharmD, PsyD, ScD), a formally combined MD/PhD program, or other combined professional/clinical and research doctoral (e.g., DDS/PhD) in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences at a domestic institution. The Kirschstein-NRSA F31 may not be used to support studies leading to the MD, DDS, or other clinical, health-professional training (e.g., DC, DMD, DNP, DO, DPM, DVM, ND, OD, AuD).
  • Students matriculated in a dual-degree program (e.g., MD/PhD, DO/PhD, DDS/PhD, DVM/PhD) who seek support for both research and clinical training may apply either for this Kirschstein-NRSA F31 program or for the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD or Other Dual-Doctoral Degree Fellowship (Parent F30) program to support both dissertation research training and clinical training.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

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Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

Application Deadline:  December 1, 2017

The Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation’s ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.

Fifteen fellowships are awarded annually. Each fellow receives an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.

Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-child development, education, epidemiology, medicine, nursing, psychology, public health, public policy, social work, and sociology. Fellows’ dissertations must be focused on an aspect of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment.

Eligibility

Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited U.S. doctoral program and have substantially completed the coursework required to be advanced to candidacy. They are expected to complete or make significant progress on their dissertation within the two-year fellowship period. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the U.S. Most applicants will not have formally submitted their dissertation proposal until after the fellowship period begins. If an applicant is conducting research in another country, they are still eligible for the fellowship but the policy focus and implications of that work must be directed to U.S. issues. Applicants may be enrolled in any discipline. Their dissertation must be applicable to practice and policy challenges facing the fields of healthy child development and child abuse prevention.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS) TL1 Research Training Program

Application Deadline:  October 30, 2017

The ITHS TL1 Program is a one-year mentored research training program in translational science for predoctoral students. This program creates a cross-disciplinary community of emerging researchers and provides them with specific training, career development opportunities, and team science skills to help them function effectively within translational science teams.

The ITHS TL1 Program supports trainees on their path to becoming successful translational investigators with the following:

  • Research and study opportunities: The program provides career development through seminars, mentored training from experienced clinical researchers, experiential learning, and networking opportunities.
  • Stipend: Trainees receive monthly predoctoral stipends, which are uniformly set for all trainees by the National Institute of Health.
  • Tuition: The TL1 Program will pay 60 percent of full-time tuition (up to $16,000/year).

Eligibility

The TL1 Program is open to students enrolled in predoctoral programs within the University of Washington. These include Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, and Social Work, as well as health-related programs in the College of Engineering and College of Arts and Sciences.

To be considered eligible for the TL1 Program, applicants must be:

  • Pre-doctoral trainees training at a post-baccalaureate level and enrolled in a program leading to a PhD in a health science research-related doctoral degree program, or a combined doctoral level professional degree plus a clinical research-related advanced degree (such as a MD, DDS, DO, DNP, PharmD/MS or MD, DDS, DO, DNP, PharmD/PhD). Students who wish to postpone their professional studies for one year to gain research experience may be appointed to the TL1 Program for that period, provided that all other eligibility criteria are met.
  • A U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, with verification documents (individuals on temporary or student visas are not eligible).
  • Able to commit full-time effort in the program at the time of appointment.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

 

Agency for Health Care Research & Quality Grants for Health Services Research Dissertation

Application Deadline:  1, 2017

The AHRQ Grants for Health Services Research Dissertation Program provides dissertation grants for doctoral candidates. This program supports dissertation research that addresses AHRQ’s mission and priorities and welcomes any areas of health services research as dissertation project topics. The grants provide up to $40,000 in direct research costs. Applications for dissertation research grants must be responsive to AHRQ’s mission, which is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable and affordable, and to work with HHS and other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used.

Candidates must:

  • Be U.S. citizens, non-citizen nationals, or permanent residents by the time of the grant award.
  • Be full-time academic students in good standing, who are enrolled in an accredited research doctoral program in such fields as behavioral sciences, health services research, nursing, social sciences, epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, health informatics, engineering, and mathematics.
  • Have completed all non-dissertation requirements for their doctoral degree by the time of submission of the application, including completion of their qualifying exams. (The only exception allowable will be the completion of required clinical internships that follow completion of the dissertation.)
  • Not have more than part-time employment in addition to the requirements of their current, full-time academic student appointments (defined as greater than 20 hours per week).
  • Not be recipients of mentored career development awards.
  • Institution is any of the following: public or non-profit private institution (such as a university, college, faith-based or community-based organization), units of local or State government, eligible agencies of the Federal Government, and Indian/Native American Tribal Government or Designated Organizations.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Pedro Zamora Public Policy Fellowship

Application Deadline:  October 15, 2017 (for spring term employment)

In the spirit of AIDS activist, educator, and reality-show trailblazer Pedro Zamora’s work to combat the spread of HIV, AIDS United offers a public policy fellowship in his name.  The Pedro Zamora Public Policy Fellowship is an excellent opportunity for both undergraduate and graduate students seeking experience in public policy and government affairs focused on HIV/AIDS issues.

Duties include:

  • Assisting in researching a variety of public health and civil rights issues related to HIV prevention, treatment and care
  • Attending Congressional hearings and coalition meetings
  • Monitoring voting records
  • Reviewing the federal register and Congressional Record
  • Preparation of briefing materials, correspondence, and mailings

Candidates should have strong research, writing and organizational skills and willingness to work in a professional office.  Ability to work independently in a fast-paced environment is critical.  Familiarity with HIV-related issues and the legislative processes is preferred. The fellowship includes a living stipend and is highly competitive.  Applications are also accepted for the summer and fall terms.

Eligibility

Both graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to apply.  Fellows must commit to working a minimum of 30 hours per week for a minimum of 16 weeks.  All people including people of color, women, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals, and HIV positive individuals are encouraged to apply. Candidates must be a U.S. citizen or have secured the necessary visa for authorized work in the U.S. prior to application. Proof of eligibility to work in the U.S. required prior to final acceptance.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program

Application Deadline: September 8, 2017

The Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program, now in its 20th year, provides early career individuals with the opportunity to spend 12 weeks at the Academies in Washington, DC learning about science and technology policy and the role that scientists and engineers play in advising the nation.

Each year, applicants from around the world become part of an Academies’ committee, board, or unit where they are assigned to a mentor and learn about the world of science and technology policy. An immersive experience, the program is designed to broaden fellows’ appreciation of employment opportunities outside academia and leave them with both a firm grasp of the important and dynamic role of science and technology in decision-making and a better understanding of the role that they can play in strengthening the science and technology enterprise for the betterment of mankind.

The 2018 session will begin on January 16 and conclude on April 6, 2018. The Fellowship offers a stipend of $9,000. Graduate and professional school students and those who have completed graduate studies within the last five years may apply.  Areas of study may include social/behavioral sciences, health and medicine, physical or biological sciences, engineering, law/business/public administration, or relevant interdisciplinary fields. 

The program is open to US citizens, US permanent residents, and non-US citizens who hold one of the following visas:

– F-1 students using CPT (curricular practical training)
– F-1 students using OPT (optional practical training)
– J-2 dependents
– J-1 students using academic training
– J-1 research scholars with written approval of their Responsible Officer
– DACA recipients
– Adjustment applicants, refugees, asylees, and selected other visa classes

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Predoctoral Fellowship in Environmental Pathology/Toxicology – Fall 2017

Application Deadline:  August 15, 2017

UW’s NIH T32 Environmental Pathology/Toxicology (EP/T) Training Program will have two predoctoral positions available beginning Fall 2017. The Program’s mission is to prepare today’s newest scientists to respond to tomorrow’s environmental health research needs by offering training in basic research on disease mechanisms related to environmental health. Our goals are to train independent research scientists who are thoroughly conversant with morphologic and mechanistic aspects of environmental pathology and toxicology, with an added emphasis on genome sciences and new opportunities for training and participating in translational and clinical research.

Positions are open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents only. Funding will be provided at standard NIH stipend levels. Currently, funding will be only for the upcoming 2017-2018 academic year. However, depending on the outcome of the pending competitive renewal, funding may be available for up to three years of support.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here. For questions regarding the application process, contact Ellen Cravens at cravense@uw.edu or 206-616-4135.

Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award

Application deadline:   August 8, 2017 (with additional cycles in December and April)

The purpose of the Kirschstein-NRSA predoctoral fellowship (F31) award is to enhance the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the research training of predoctoral students from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research workforce, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups and those with disabilities. Through this award program, promising predoctoral students will obtain individualized, mentored research training from outstanding faculty sponsors while conducting well-defined research projects in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers. The proposed mentored research training is expected to clearly enhance the individual’s potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientist.

Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree and be currently enrolled in a PhD or equivalent research degree program (e.g., EngD, DNSc, DrPH, DSW, PharmD, PsyD, ScD), a formally combined MD/PhD program, or other combined professional/clinical and research doctoral (e.g., DDS/PhD) in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences at a domestic institution. The Kirschstein-NRSA F31 may not be used to support studies leading to the MD, DDS, or other clinical, health-professional training (e.g., DC, DMD, DNP, DO, DPM, DVM, ND, OD, AuD).

For complete information about this opportunity, click here.

Agency for Health Care Research & Quality Grants for Health Services Research Dissertation

Application Deadline:  August 1, 2017

The AHRQ Grants for Health Services Research Dissertation Program provides dissertation grants for doctoral candidates. This program supports dissertation research that addresses AHRQ’s mission and priorities and welcomes any areas of health services research as dissertation project topics. The grants provide up to $40,000 in direct research costs. Applications for dissertation research grants must be responsive to AHRQ’s mission, which is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable and affordable, and to work with HHS and other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used.

Candidates must:

  • Be U.S. citizens, non-citizen nationals, or permanent residents by the time of the grant award.
  • Be full-time academic students in good standing, who are enrolled in an accredited research doctoral program in such fields as behavioral sciences, health services research, nursing, social sciences, epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, health informatics, engineering, and mathematics.
  • Have completed all non-dissertation requirements for their doctoral degree by the time of submission of the application, including completion of their qualifying exams. (The only exception allowable will be the completion of required clinical internships that follow completion of the dissertation.)
  • Not have more than part-time employment in addition to the requirements of their current, full-time academic student appointments (defined as greater than 20 hours per week).
  • Not be recipients of mentored career development awards.
  • Institution is any of the following: public or non-profit private institution (such as a university, college, faith-based or community-based organization), units of local or State government, eligible agencies of the Federal Government, and Indian/Native American Tribal Government or Designated Organizations.

For more information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.

UW Population Health Graduate Student Conference Travel Awards

Application Deadline:  April 28, 2017

The University of Washington’s Population Health Initiative is offering Graduate Student Conference Travel Awards of up to $1,500 to further students’ academic, research, or professional goals as they strive to become the next generation of leaders in population health. The application period for this round of funding opens on April 10, 2017 and closes on Friday, April 28, 2017.

These awards are open to graduate students on all three campuses who:

  1. Are currently enrolled in a graduate degree program.
  2. Have been accepted to present a population health-related paper, poster, or exhibit, or to serve as an invited speaker, at a conference, symposium, or other professional and academic meeting. Students in the arts may request funding for invited performances or installations.

The Initiative views population health as a broad concept encompassing not only the elimination of diseases and injuries, but also the intersecting and overlapping factors that influence health. These influencing factors include the environment, education, mobility, policy and governance, poverty, racism, infrastructure, access to technology, urban planning and many more.

In order to apply, an applicant must be nominated by a faculty member. Once nominated, applicants will receive an email with a link to their portion of the application.

For complete information about this opportunity, including how to apply, click here.